Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever

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Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever

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Description

Popularly referred to as the "Toller," the Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever is one of the smallest retrievers. Despite its size, it's one of the most energetic dogs with a big heart. In fact, the Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever can keep you and your family on your toes thanks to its boundless energy.

While its a fun and loyal companion, the Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever is tougher than most people think. Unlike other hunting dogs that chase ducks, this water-loving dog lures them closer along the shore for the perfect shot.

This graceful dancing technique is known as "tolling," hence its nickname "toller." Want to know more about the Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever breed history, general appearance, and more?

In this post, we discuss the history of the Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever breed, its personality, and more.

History of the Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever

Often mistaken for a small Golden retriever, the Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever breed is a medium-sized gundog. Originally from Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia, Canada, the Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever was bred to lure and retrieve waterfowl.

Bred in the 19th century by hunters, the dog entices the ducks by onshore antics. Its antics involve quick movements that attract the attention of the prey, luring them into the open. Before being nicknamed the "toller," the dog was initially called "Little River Duck" dogs.

What you need to know is that the Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever is valuable to hunters. Why? They are willing to enter the water to retrieve the downed waterfowl. The breed remained a secret among Nova Scotia hunters for many years until they were first recognized by the Canadian Kennel Club in 1945.

Since then, the breed has continued to gain popularity. In fact, modern tollers receive a lot of praise from their owners. Why? They have adapted well to the life of hunting and life as a family dog.

Induction into the Kennel Club

The Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever breed is a mixture of spaniels, setters, a farm collie mixed breed, and retrievers. Perfect in the second half of the 19th century, the Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever breed gained official recognition in 1945. This is when the Canadian Kennel Club officially recognized the breed.

The breed gained national recognition in the 1980s and declared as a provincial dog of Nova Scotia in 1995. It first came in the United States in the 1960s but never gained much interest until 1984. This is the year when the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever Club USA was formed.

Due to its popularity in the US, the Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever received official recognition by the American Kennel Club in 2001 (Miscellaneous Class) and 2003 (Sporting Group).

Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever General Appearance

The toller is a handsome dog. It weighs 35 to 50 pounds, has a height of 17 to 21 inches with a red-gold coat with white markings. Thanks to their boundless energy, they can hunt, swim, hike, and even play around in your backyard. As your best friend, the Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever loves to be active. When not active, their almond-shaped eyes have a sad expression, but once they start working, you will love their intensity and focus.

In fact, you will note that their heavily feathered tail will be high and in constant motion while retrieving or working. As a medium-sized and powerful dog, it has a clean-cut and slightly wedge-shaped head. Its broad skull is slightly rounded, and the occiput is not prominent.

The dog's neck is strongly muscled and of medium length. The body is also muscular, and so is the back. Its forequarters are well angulated with the elbows working closely to the body. As such, the foreleg's appearance is strong and slightly sloping.

Its feet are slightly oval and medium in size with well-arched toes. Because the Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever was first bred in Nova Scotia, it has a water repellent double coat of medium length and softness. It also has a soft, dense undercoat to protect itself while retrieving in icy waters.

Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever Personality and Training

Tollers are powerful, curious, smart, and intelligent. They have a sense of humor and an upbeat attitude. When not retrieving or playing, they are ok to lie down and be quiet. Tollers are adaptable and can move from one environment to another with ease.

As a hunting dog, the Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever loves the outdoors. That is why it's suited for an active country dwelling family. When it comes to training, it can be a challenge. Why? Tollers can be stubborn, which stands in the way of training.

To train a Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever, experts recommend short training sessions. It would be best if you combined this with consistent and positive reinforcement. Don't forget to incorporate some basic obedience training. This helps to curb the dog's wily behavior.

Taking Care of Your Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever

The Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever is an active dog. As such, it needs plenty of daily exercises. This calls for an hour of activity every day. For example, you can take the dog for long walks, runs, or even hunting. You can play with the dog in the backyard or engage in canine sports.

Thanks to the daily exercise, it will keep the dog motivated and not bored. When it comes to grooming, experts recommend weekly brushing and regular nail trimming.

Colors

•  Dark Red
•  Golden Red
•  Light Red

Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever's for Sale




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